Lancaster’s old market hall

18 02 2011

It was absolutely phenomenal in the old market (before the fire) you couldn’t walk through the aisles and get past people, there wasn’t a supermarket.  Lancaster itself, the town, was where all the food was; in the market and around about. It was so good to go to work there, it was really busy, people could by fresh all the time and you didn’t overbuy what you wanted.

We have survived through the loyalty of customers buying local produce, its the quality of cheese that we sell. We sell Lancashire off the truckle and you don’t normally get that in a supermarket.

The second in a series of posts recounting the things people have talked about during the project is about the old Lancaster covered Market Hall and the quotes and images in this post come from Ron Wood, the Marsh History Group and traders in Burgess Cheese, The Bacon Stall, Bebe Babette and D Gregory the butcher.

There was a single floor victorian market hall that tragically burned down in 1984, a new market was built and opened almost 10 years later but it has been a controversial venture as its architecture is very different (on two floors, with steps up to most entrances and defined stalls rather then flat and open plan) and its new position takes it away from the natural flow and movement of people through town. Far fewer people pass through its doors than did in the old market, as someone said to me;  If it was all on one floor and we were all together it would be a much better market. But despite this there is a great rapport between traders and customers, an a real sense of care about the produce traders sell. I always came home with a huge bag of market purchases from homemade ham, to local honey, Lancashire cheese to local kippers, and I wish I was much closer to use the market more often.

The market has been threatened with closure to which many people have reacted strongly, participating in protests that raise the issues of how important a community, social and civic space the market is. People I spoke to remembered that because the old market hall was on ground level they often walked through the market on their way somewhere, something they would be unlikely to do now.  The market now faces financial difficulties that must be exacerbated both by the aftermath of the fire and by radical changes in shopping habits, however in many of my projects people have told me that it is the more informal, ‘human’ scale places like markets (rather then chains or superstores) that give them a sense of community. It seems also to be one of the places where people feel they can easily find out where their food has come from, and markets are often one of the places where food can be bought economically and with waste rather than in set packages – so if you only want one tomato, you need buy one tomato.

The Markets are meeting places for people, so long may they reign – the  big chains and supermarkets are making the high streets like ghost towns.

A lot of the customers rely on us and without the market there would be a lot less character in the town.

On his blog, Ronnies Rambles you can see some of  Ron Wood’s films about Lancaster local life, the market, the protests against the threats of closure and the fire including his films:

From Out of The Ashes about the fire in 1984 and

The Stall Holders of Lancaster Covered Market March to Lancaster, about the recent protests against closure – below

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